Southern Identity Found to Be “Mortifying”, “Heartbreaking”, Results in Apology

America was 13 colonies, each granted independence by the British; but the heritage of 6 of those colonies is not tolerated.

A recent prom photo of Colorado students posing behind a Confederate flag has created outrage, followed by the predictable apology.

That the South can trace back to Virginia Dare’s birth in 1587 and to the later successful Jamestown Settlement is apparently irrelevant. That slavery wasn’t banned in the Middle East until the early to mid 20th century and did not originate in the US South is ignored. American states were very different, decentralised until the unification of the 14th Amendment; but today that distinct heritage is oppressed.

The US was not always such a pleasant destination for immigrants. It had to first be colonised, developed from a wilderness. The heritage of those early colonists deserves respect. No society is perfect, and there is more to the South than a heritage of slavery.

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9 thoughts on “Southern Identity Found to Be “Mortifying”, “Heartbreaking”, Results in Apology

  1. weavercht Post author

    Those who say Southern identity is divisive are mistaken. It is intolerance of the South that is divisive. Every people have a right to treasure their heritage, and Northern heritage is not without flaw. Most every immigrant group into the US will have its share of national sins as well.

    It is simply unfair for us to be singled out to be ethnically cleansed.

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    1. Gary O'Dell

      What about the intolerance of Appalachian identity? The many negative stereotypes portray a dim culture somehow outside mainstream America.

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      1. weavercht Post author

        Cecil Sharp had to search Appalachia to recover lost English folk traditions that had vanished from England herself.

        Appalachians are known for being hardy, survivalists. A similarly rugged environment, Corsica, produced the indomitable Napoleon. I expect Appalachia to produce similar men, though brain drain there is a concern as with any difficult, rural environment.

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      2. hawthornecht

        Questions like these, is exactly what sites like this should be investigating. Deliverance (which is an excellent study in changes of metapolitics), Wrong Turn–and yet, it feels like that is many years ago, and no longer relevant. Leviathan’s war on coal has wiped these people out, save one last brother, Jesse Trentadue who battles on in sake of a brother, perhaps our last great battle. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2708050/Did-Oklahoma-City-bomber-accomplice-How-one-mans-mystery-death-jail-cell-brothers-quest-justice-upend-understanding-domestic-terror-attack.html

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  2. hawthornecht

    The South cannot recover in 2015 as long as they offer failed support for the previous Cheap Labor Lobby regime–that is why there is demonization–it’s the flag of a race traitor Cheap Labor Lobby regime and should anyone figure it out, could prove trouble to the current ruling Cheap Labor Lobby regime which would go along way in losing the Southern support for every stupid war Lindsey Graham is blackmailed into supporting. Going to school in the Northeast, we read tracts from pamphleteers about the slave system, written by real Southern Men as the war approached. It was material we all here could relate to. Then their sons and brothers and fathers were sent off to war, but you have heard this story before. When the modern South figures out this mystery, we can get ourselves moving forward.

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    1. hawthornecht

      To be clear, I don’t look at the Confederate flag that way, that is just how the Deep State views it. The Stars and Bars is still the banner half my ancestors rallied too, against another Cheap Labor Lobby invader.

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      1. weavercht Post author

        I don’t have issue with you reg. WBTS. I often fuss at Southerners for obsessing over Yankees and overglorifying the South actually. I like Mike’s anti-Yankee posts, but he writes against a spirit. And he doesn’t insinuate that *all* Yankees were and are of that spirit. It’s a different thing. Mike’s posts are very good.

        And I’ve argued Yankee immigration is not as transformative as immigration from most everywhere else. Those who wish to preserve the South should look to other nationalist movements: They tend to categorise immigrants as being more-transformative and less-transformative. At times when I’ve condemned Yankee immigration, it has been intended in the way the Amish use the word: to represent all outsiders. We are in fairness flooded today, when before we were not.

        Back on topic, the Southern argument made now is that the Northern wage slavery is more exploitative than Southern slavery. Southerners cared for their slaves; Northerners let workers fend for themselves and are always impiously seeking profit above everything else. I prefer your position against both Cheap Labour lobbies. Lee criticised slavery in a way you would approve, and often its most popular defence seemed to be fear of what newly freed slaves would do (lower wages, cause crime), their being unfamiliarised with life as freemen. As Jefferson described it: Holding the wolf by the ears. You can’t let him go.

        I don’t tolerate those who claim the WBTS attack on the South was justified or positive, but you’ve never done that. And you don’t cherish Lincoln and Sherman. Criticism of the South can be *good*. I just can’t tolerate those who justify unnecessary war or who look down on Southern culture / people, except where justified of course. Criticism, again, can be good. There did seem to be a strong class rivalry here between planters and poor whites.

        I dislike how Americans identify with political positions as if such could define a people. I like aspects of the South, love everything outside the political. I obviously don’t like slavery, and free trade is out of vogue. I fear “Southern political traditions” today could lead to essentially Wall Street values if applied today, which is to say society has changed. I do prefer Southern agrarian and chivalric values. The North is too English-liberal, urban, merchant, progressive, individualistic, nuclear family, universal, impious, meddlesome, and so forth. The same can be said of the South, but we’re less-so. And that less-so tends to be what I like. You can look at the difference in how much more strongly the North supported the American Revolution. The South was more hesitant, more conservative. I would jump in to say the North was more imperial, but I’m not sure that argument would hold up. All that said, I’m not really expert on all of this. I know enough to have a sense of things, know some things. I also know many of the usual narratives don’t seem to hold up to scrutiny.

        Everything is a math problem really. I would likely find the relevant patterns you see interesting. In the past you seemed to believe I want a technocratic state. To the extent I know what that is, I’d say I’d only want such if necessary for survival. I don’t like capitalism, but the distributive criticisms tend to call for small government solutions, wariness of big business, far off elites, and dislike of transience really. Something like prohibition only seems to work, imperfectly, at a local level. I wouldn’t want widespread spying, nor gun control, things commonly associated with technocratic states. One of the best arguments for religion and morality in a society is it allows for a greater degree of freedom. People are willingly supportive of society; they don’t need to be forced or brainwashed. So, I don’t think I’m technocratic. This area has been more my issue with you, though it seems more like a miscommunication – and of course it’s unimportant.

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  3. roho

    Weaver………………I agree……………The World assumes that the Confederacy invented slavery, yet it was common business of the times. The British had lost sooooooo many Irish slaves on Caribbean Sugar Plantations, that they realized that African Negro Slaves could tolerate the tropical climate, survive, and produce far better than the Irish slave? Sugar was the bomb before cotton was King. (Do you think that negroes are the indiginious people of the Caribbean?) Slavery was the price paid for losing a war for thousands of years!…….All defeated combatants were enslaved, as well as their citizens.

    Yet the world thinks that the CSA invented slavery?……LOL!………The world has spent it’s entire existence on the search for CHEAP LABOR, and nothing is cheaper than SLAVE LABOR!……As stupid as thinking that Germans were bad and Japanese treated their captives like guests?…..LOL!……..The NAACP was founded by JEWS, ran by JEWS, and turned over to negroes with the same blueprint used by JEWS to manipulate the thinking of the citizenry. The heritage of the South was a threat to all oligarchs. The day that the first Ironclad moved into combat, every warship in the world became obsolete!………..We invented the first Submarine!….Yet we were simply dumb-ass cotton farmers?………Yea Right!………We were a threat to the world order as it was in the mid 1800’s…………Every European nation had a team here to record and note the “War Of Northern Agression” in case their own subjects declared independence?………Even WWI stratigist refered back to our war as a reference for strategy.

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  4. roho

    Ever noticed how La Raza fills the streets with undocumented workers carrying the foreign Mexican Flag proud and loud?……..With no consequenses. Should America not be offended? Or at least the decendents of the Alamo? But PC lives there.

    Reconstruction was not a temporary fix, but an ongoing strategy. Birmingham is like a big watermelon that no one is allowed to eat. When the industrialists came here, they could not believe their eyes. Everything needed to make steel was in the ground here. The Statue “Vulcan” sit’s atop “Red Mountain” which is a mountain of iron ore, and coal is everywhere. Being a defeated nation, labor was cheap for both the steel mills and fabric mills. It lasted maybe two generations.

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